NIGMS

Human Genetic Cell Repository


The NIGMS Human Genetic Cell Repository, sponsored by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, provides scientists around the world with resources for cell and genetic research. Established in 1972 at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research, the NIGMS Repository contains more than 11,400 cell lines, primarily fibroblasts and transformed lymphoblasts, and over 5,800 DNA samples. Currently, the NIGMS HGCR catalog also contains more than 50 iPSC lines. Repository samples represent a variety of disease states, chromosomal abnormalities, apparently healthy individuals and many distinct human populations.

Data on this website and information derived from the samples in the NIGMS Repository may not be used to determine the identity of any individual who provided a sample. Please direct any questions about this policy to NIGMS@coriell.org.

NIGMS News

  • Feb 2018

    Rare NGLY1 Mutation Samples Now Available from Coriell Institute for Medical Research

    The Coriell Institute for Medical Research is proud to announce the release of new samples representing N-glycanase deficiency, caused by a mutation on the NGLY 1 gene, also known as Congenital Disorder of Deglycosylation (CDDG). These extraordinarily well characterized samples come from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) Undiagnosed Disease Program (UDP) and will be distributed from the National Institute for General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) Human Genetic Cell Repository (HGCR) housed at Coriell.

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  • Dec 2017

    iPSC Lines Added to NIST Reference Materials Collection

    The Coriell Institute for Medical Research (Coriell) has added induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) to its collection of highly characterized cell lines offered by Coriell and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

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  • Aug 2017

    Coriell Attends Cure CMD Conference for Scientific, Patient Communities

    This July, the Cure CMD Scientific and Family Conference in Washington D.C. brought together researchers, patients, families and advocacy groups in their push for research regarding congenital muscular dystrophy.

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