Media Kits & Quotes

Michael Christman, PhD, President and CEO.
On the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell laboratory at Coriell:

“This is the perfect opportunity to incorporate a revolutionary technology into the study of rare human disorders with the hope of furthering researchers’ understanding of disease development. We see the introduction of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into Coriell’s collections as critical because of their vast potential for pre-clinical drug trials, therapeutic use, and regenerative medicine.”

 

Michael Christman, PhD, President and CEO.
On pharmacogenomics (PGx):

“If you have a gene variation that influences how you metabolize a blood thinner, and your physician prescribes dosing instructions accordingly, the practice of medicine is now safer, well-timed, accurate, and cost-effective for you and our healthcare system.”

 

Michael Christman, PhD, President and CEO.
On personalized medicine:

 “Personalized medicine will help physicians identify disease risks sooner and make the best prescribing decisions, resulting in safer and more accurate care for their patients.”

 

Mark Bellafante, Director of Information Technology.
On the IT infrastructure that supports the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative research study:

“When CPMC participants log into the portal, their authentication information and anything that’s personally identifying to the participants is kept in a separate database from the actual genetic information and risk reports. Participants can rest assured that their private data is protected.”

 

Tara Schmidlen, MS, CGC, Genetic Counseling.
On the role of genetic counseling:

"The Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative research study is unique in several ways. One such aspect is the prominent role of genetic counseling in the study. We believe that participants should receive a holistic understanding of their risk results. We also recognize the importance of educating physicians and patients for a near future when they will have access to the incredible amount of genome information available.”